“Disasters can be seen as sudden and calamitous events causing significant damage, loss…

“Disasters can be seen as sudden and calamitous events causing significant damage, loss or destruction. Disasters can be natural, technological or social in origin.“ (Moore et al., 2007). The first five steps of a disaster in healthcare are prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Prevention is an activity to avoid incidents and casualties. Mitigation guides the measurement of prevention in an emergency, reduces the chances of an emergency occurring, or reduces the damaging effects of any unavoidable emergencies. Preparedness of a disaster includes establishing standard aid agreements and memos of accepting, response personnel, worried citizens training and reinforcing training to conduct disaster exercises and campaigning education all-hazards. Response conducts of saving lives, reducing economic losses and sufferings are carried out right away prior, during, and following after a hazard impact. Actions were taken to return a community to normal or near-normal conditions, including restoring essential services and repairing physical, social, and economic damages. Finally, it allows organizations to increase their overall capacity and resiliency to experience and recover from any disaster. These five steps allow organizations to create organization-wide strategies to plan for disasters well ahead to prepare for any type of disaster, artificial or otherwise. Not all disasters can be prevented, but utilizing the five steps can be an effective tool in planning and mitigating the risk of life and loss during a disaster through aggressive planning efforts.

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Reference

Moore, S., Mawji, A., Shiell, A., & Noseworthy, T. (2007). Public health preparedness: a systems-level approach. Journal of epidemiology and community health, 61(4), 282–286. Retrieved from: https://doi.org/10.1136/jech.2004.030783